The March on Washington

Expand/Collapse The March on Washington


This year marks the 51st anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom and will be commemorated by teachers and students across the country and around the world. Help your students appreciate the significance of this event – and its role in the larger Civil Rights Movement using this collection of digital content from PBS LearningMedia.

 

  • Excerpts from the March on Washington, Part 1

    This audio compilation, recorded live at the 1963 March on Washington, captures the voices of several civil rights leaders.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Excerpts from the March on Washington, Part 2

    This audio compilation, recorded live at the 1963 March on Washington, pays tribute to the women -- both leaders and widows of slain leaders -- of the Civil Rights movement.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Excerpts from the March on Washington, Part 3

    Recorded live at the 1963 March on Washington, this audio segment captures the voice of SNCC leader John Lewis.

    Grades: 6-12
  • March on Washington Flyers

    These 1963 flyers announce the speakers and issues for the March on Washington; from the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.

    Grades: 3-12
  • Official Program for the March on Washington (1963) and Resource Materials

    This program listed the events scheduled at the Lincoln Memorial during the August 28, 1963, March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The highlight of the march, which attracted 250,000 people, was Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • Civil Rights Act (1964) and Resource Materials

    This act, signed into law by President Johnson on July 2, 1964, prohibited discrimination in public places, provided for the integration of schools and other public facilities, and made employment discrimination illegal.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington Lesson Plan: A Time for Change

    Use this lesson plan and interactive timeline to see the sequence of events leading up to the iconic March on Washington, who was involved in the march and what the march hoped to achieve.

    Grades: 7-12
  • The 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington Lesson Plan: “I Have a Dream” Speech as a Visionary Text

    Help your students connect to the rich imagery of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech by learning the history of the speech and then illustrating some of its most famous lines in this creative lesson plan.

    Grades: 6-8
  • March on Washington Lesson Plan: Racial Equality-How Far Have We Come and How Far do We Still Need to Go?

    Martin Luther King dreamed of an America where people could “not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” Use this lesson plan to start a discussion in your classroom.

    Grades: 7-12
  • March on Washington: Math Lesson with materials

    Use this engaging lesson plan to bring math into the equation, so to speak, with a classroom activity that helps students create a representative population of the march’s attendees.

    Grades: 7-12
  • The March

    These excerpts from the documentary The March document the events leading up to The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which drew more than 200,000 people to the National Mall on August 28, 1963.

    Grades: 6-12
  • March on Washington: Fair or Unfair with materials

    Make issues of fairness, justice and discrimination personal to your students with this lesson plan, which includes an activity with Dr. Seuss!

    Grades: 7-12
  • The 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington: Leadership at the March through Music and Speeches

    Use this lesson plan to look at the other civil rights leaders and orators who spoke that day, and how effectively they conveyed their messages.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Analyzing King's "I Have a Dream" Speech Lesson Plan

    Students study Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech and discuss the rhetorical influences on King's speech, the oratorical devices that King uses in delivering his speech and how a speech is similar to/different from other literary forms.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • Analyzing King's "I Have a Dream" Speech Video

    In this video, schoolchildren take turns reading from Martin Luther King, Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream Speech" on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

    Grades: 6-13+

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